Call for entries: Visions of a Clean Energy Future art contest

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014
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The NW Energy Coalition is accepting entries for its 2014 art contest, Visions of a Clean Energy Future. The contest gives artists the opportunity to develop a vision of a clean and affordable energy future and to portray that vision in a unique work of art. The submission deadline is Friday, Oct. 10.



Please join us for Founding the Future, a NW Energy Coalition Gala in Portland, Ore.

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014
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Join us on November 7 at Portland’s Crowne Plaza Hotel for our gala event, Founding the Future. Honor NW Energy Coalition founders and help build our region’s clean energy future. At the gala, clean energy leaders from across the Northwest will enjoy a delicious plated dinner, drinks and great conversation. We hope to raise a glass with you that evening.



Kelsey Jae Nunez named executive director of Snake River Alliance

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014
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After a rigorous national search and interview process, the Snake River Alliance Board of Directors has hired Kelsey Jae Nunez as the Alliance’s new Executive Director. Nunez, who will assume her leadership of the Alliance in her new capacity on August 11, replaces Liz Woodruff, who left the Alliance this month to pursue other opportunities and challenges in the Idaho nonprofit sector.



The Tyee Op-Ed: BC’s climate plan is working, so why stop now?

Thursday, July 24th, 2014
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Josha McNab of the Pembina Institute explains that while British Columbia has made significant progress toward carbon reduction, there is room for improvement. A new Climate Action Plan would help reduce carbon while simultaneously strengthening B.C.’s clean energy economy.



Crosscut article: Are the feds simply shielding Columbia River dams from wrecking balls?

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014
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Conservation groups, tribes, fishing groups and the state of Oregon are taking the federal government to court again because its Biological Opinion (BiOp), regarding Columbia River hydro operations, inadequately address the needs of the river’s 13 endangered salmon species. Despite previous rulings in the plaintiff’s favor, the federal government has delayed making court-ordered improvements to the BiOp.